What Happened to Mystery?

The limit of human knowledge in theology is an interesting concept with a long history. In the first centuries of Christianity, the church resisted attempts to oversimplify doctrine. The first significant theological controversy the orthodox faced focused on the doctrine of the Trinity. Growing out of the strict monotheism of Judaism, the early church wrestled […]

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The Euthyphro Dilemma

Charles Spurgeon famously said that “the proper study of God’s elect is God… There is something exceedingly improving to the mind in a contemplation of the Divinity. It is a subject so vast, that all our thoughts are lost in its immensity; so deep, that our pride is drowned in its infinity.”[1] Indeed, examining the […]

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John 1, the Word, and Jesus

John 1 has some of the deepest reflection on the identity of Christ in the entire New Testament. Every Christmas, I return to this passage to contemplate the incarnation. Without fail, I am always awed at what I find in the first fourteen verses of this chapter. Unfortunately, some of the language John uses can […]

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St. Irenaeus and Pastor-Theologians

While listing the requirements of a pastor in Titus 1, Paul says a pastor “must hold firmly to the trustworthy message as it has been taught, so that he can encourage others by sound doctrine and refute those who oppose it.”[1] In other words, one of the requirements for being a pastor is understanding theology […]

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Christianity and Science

The second question Thomas Aquinas poses to himself in his massive Summa Theologica is “whether sacred doctrine is a science.” Much to the surprise of modern ears, Aquinas—one of the greatest theologians of all time—answers in the affirmative saying, “sacred doctrine is a science.” In a time where we assume science and religion are mutually […]

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Anselm’s Ontological Argument

Most people immediately recognize Ludwig van Beethoven’s famous “Fur Elise.” As a young piano student, a much-simplified version of this classic piece was a core element of piano lessons. I ask you this question: Would Beethoven’s “Fur Elise” have been greater if Beethoven had only heard the melody in his imagination, or is “Fur Elise” […]

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Good Reads: “The Brothers Karamazov” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

There are no spoilers in this book review. All parenthetical citations are from this edition: Dostoyevsky, Fyodor. The Brothers Karamazov. Translated by Constance Garnett. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, 2005. 718 pages. Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov is a fascinating murder mystery about the exploits of three brothers: Ivan, Dmitri, and Alyosha. The three brothers, though […]

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